Articles

A well-trained team of armed security personnel may improve safety in healthcare facilities, experts say. However, this approach carries risks, and analysts emphasize the need for a multipronged approach to security.
Use of marijuana by expectant mothers in the United States rose 62 percent from 2002 through 2014, raising concerns among researchers even as legalization of pot has spread.
One in six women with early-stage unilateral breast cancer undergoes double mastectomy even when it is unlikely to provide a survival benefit, according to a recent Jama Surgery study.
A vast range of personal and sociocultural factors affect women’s well-being, making women’s health a field that is in a constant state of change.
A major trial demonstrated the glucose-lowering drug empagliflozin reduces cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in individuals with Type 2 diabetes and existing cardiovascular disease. Clinicians and researchers discuss how it does so and who is most likely to benefit.
Results of a phase 1b clinical trial published in Nature reveal scientists may be one step closer to finding a treatment that safely impedes the biological progression of Alzheimer’s disease.
Although it is established that the incidence of epilepsy is higher among individuals with autoimmune disorders — particularly those that directly affect the brain — a Danish study published in Neurology has specifically linked epilepsy risk among children to whether their mothers have rheumatoid arthritis (RA).
Improbable ideas can take off, making investors the newest residents of Easy Street. (Who knew sunglasses for dogs — Doggles — would grow into a $3 million-a-year enterprise for a woman whose border collie was sensitive to light?)
This isn’t your grandfather’s physician.
A study in the Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience found that a handshake “not only increases the positive effect toward a favorable interaction, but it also diminishes the impact of a negative impression.”
Generating the right pool of physician candidates for a position is tricky under the best of circumstances. It’s tougher still without a clear understanding of what physicians value.
Curiosity may kill the cat, but unasked questions are murder on an estate plan.
The growth of EHRs has boosted use of medical assistant scribes. A study in The Journal of Family Practice suggests that may be a worthwhile investment.
Millions of Americans are affected by mental illness. However, a worsening shortage of mental health services could block access to promising new therapies for many.